The Vancouver Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association is a non-profit charity that supports people who are adversely affected by gluten, dermatitis herpetiformis, and other gluten-related conditions.



Restaurant Events:
Tuesday, September 20, 2016Iki Japanese 6pm

Tuesday, September 20, 2016
Gluten-Free: Fad, Fiction or Required? 6:30pm


All events and details....

The gluten problem: Found. Treated. Cured.

Celiac Disease (CD) is a genetic, multi-system, autoimmune disorder where the body reacts to gluten and other prolamines in wheat (e.g. durum, kamut, spelt), rye and barley.  Gluten consumption causes damage to the absorptive surface of the small intestine and can result in malnutrition, anemia, nutritional deficiencies and an increased risk of other autoimmune diseases and some cancers of the gut. Every person is different and there may be no symptoms, but damage is still being done.  More information can be found at the Canadian Celiac Association website.
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Last Updated
Sep 15th 2016
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More news...

Carnivorous plant enzymes could help celiacs digest gluten, says U of C researcher,
CBC News by Tricia Lo, August 8, 2016
University of Calgary researchers, have made a breakthrough that could help celiac patients digest gluten with the help of an enzyme from bug-eating pitcher plants. These plants have "disposable stomachs" that are filled with an enzyme-rich liquid that helps them digest insect prey. The lead researcher is David Schriemer says that celiac patients may be able to take the extract like "beano". Full study is included in Nature at
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep30980

Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease
Researchers including Dr. Peter Green found that there is a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. In other words, NCGS is not all in their head. Much more research is required in this area.
Non- Celiac Wheat Sensitivity is Official
https://celiac.org/blog/2016/08/non-celiac-wheat-sensitivity-is-official

Jury Still Out on Celiac Disease Screening, U.S. Doctors Say
There is not enough evidence to propose widespread screening for Celiac Disease. Guidelines do recommend screening for those with a close relative with celiac disease stated Dr. Joseph Murray, Mayo Clinic, as they are at increased risk for the disease.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862838?src=wnl_edit_tpal

Neurological Dysfunction in Coeliac Disease and Non-coeliac Gluten Sensitivity
562 patients were studied: 228 or 41% had enteropathy (CD) and 59% did not (NCGS). The severity of ataxia did not differ between the two groups, although those with CD had more severe neuropathy. All patients responded to a GF diet. tTG antibodies were similar in the two groups. The researchers concluded that both groups had similar neurological issues and that there is currently a risk that if diagnosed with NCGS, the neurological issues will not be dealt with. American Journal of Gastroenteroly
2016;111(4):561-567.

Honeycomb app can be customized to user's allergies, likes and dislikes
A Vancouver Sun article talks about a local business that has developed an application on honeycomb.ai that will enable you to find restaurant menu items that will meet your allergy or in our case gluten-free needs. It is currently in Beta testing and enables you to pick by price, location and your specific needs if you have registered. There is no cost to the user as money is made from the restaurants.
h p://vancouversun.com/business/local-business/food-allergy-sensi vity-new-app-from-vancouver- developers-will-help-you-navigate-restaurant-menus

Early recognition of coeliac disease through community pharmacies: a proof of concept study
Fifteen pharmacies in UK had pharmacists administer a test for celiac disease, when customers brought forward common celiac disease symptoms. Of 554 administered the test 9.4% had CD. The study concluded that pharmacies could effectively either refer patients for testing, or be a site for testing for CD. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 2016 Aug 8.

Duodenal Bacteria from Celiac Patients Has Distinct Impact on Gluten Breakdown and Immunogenicity
A research team from around the world, including Canada's Farncombe Digestive Family Centre and McMaster University, studied gluten metabolism by opportunistic pathogens and commensal duodenal bacteria, and to characterize the ability of the resulting peptides to activate gluten-specific T-cells from celiac patients. They colonized germ-free mice with bacteria isolated from the small intestine of celiac patients or healthy controls. These mice were selected by their in vitro gluten-degrading capacity. They then measured gliadin levels and proteolytic action in intestinal contents after gluten feeding. They found that the bacterial colonizations created clear gluten degradation patterns in the small intestine of the mice.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa), an opportunistic
pathogen from celiac patients, exhibited elastase activity and produced peptides that better translocated the mouse intestinal barrier. Psa-modified gluten peptides activated gluten-specific T-cells from celiac patients. In contrast, Lactobacillus spp. from the duodenum of non-celiac controls degraded gluten peptides produced by human and Psa proteases, reducing their immunogenicity. In other words, the bacteria in the gut of celiac patients impacts their immune response. This microbe-gluten-host interaction may modulate autoimmune risk in genetically susceptible persons and may underlie any connection between celiac disease and microbial imbalance or maladaptation in the digestive tract. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27373514

Beyond Celiac has developed some free Back to School Kits
Back to School Toolkit
: School prep begins this month, and parents with children on a gluten-free diet have a few extra items on their back to school checklists.

Gluten-Free in College Toolkit: Prepping for college is stressful, but when you throw a gluten-free diet into the mix, things can get intimidating.
These free resources can be found at:
http://www.beyondceliac.org/community/Get-Social/Monthly-Social-Media- Happenings/1377/


Gluten-Free Certification Program -  The CCA has spent several years developing a voluntary certification program based on a preventative approach for managing the production of gluten-free products.  This symbol is the copyright of the Allergen Control Group who now manages the certification of gluten-free products.  To see vendors who have been certified check out their website or look for this symbol on products in your stores.